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At Carolina, we are committed to providing you with the support and opportunities needed to make the most of your university experience. We offer a broad range of resources to meet your needs at all points throughout your academic career, and we encourage you to explore these options that are uniquely available to you. Remember, utilizing campus resources is a sign of strength: it shows perseverance, responsibility and a commitment to your goals.

The Thrive Booklet is full of opportunities and programs here at Carolina.

We have listed here a range of resources available to you, but if you find yourself having questions, please ask! Your advisors, your professors and staff all across campus are happy to help you find the resource you’re looking for. Also, feel free to reach out to anyone on the Advising Team page. We would love to help!

Resources for All Students

Download the pdf of Student Success at Carolina by clicking on the image or using the link provided. https://advising.unc.edu/files/2020/07/UNC-Defining-Student-Succees.V19.pdf (opens in a new window)

  • The Academic Advising Program
    Steele Building, (919) 966-5116
    Assists students with all aspects of their academic planning and provides guidance in appropriate decision-making throughout students’ undergraduate studies.
  • Academic Support Program for Student Athletes
    Loudermilk Center for Excellence, 344 Ridge Road
    Provides academic counseling, a first year transition program, proactive monitoring, study skills development workshops, a tutoring program, and career counseling services.
  • Equal Opportunity and Compliance Office 
    137 E. Franklin St., Suite 404
    The central office for addressing issues related to discrimination and harassment, as well as compliance with relevant education and employment laws and regulations. Also supports parenting students in the negotiation of accommodations.
  • Honors Carolina
    Graham Memorial, (919) 966-5110
    Honors Carolina students enjoy specially-designed courses, research opportunities, field trips, discussion groups, and dinners.
  • Undergraduate Research
    Steele Building (Third Floor), (919) 843-7763
    By engaging in undergraduate research, students learn to apply what they already know to new issues that interest them.
  • University Libraries
    The UNC library system is consistently ranked among the top twenty in the country, and is one of the leading research libraries in the South. Students can find scholarly materials to support every learning endeavor and contact librarians by phone, online or in-person.
  • Math Help Center
    The Math Help Center (MHC) provides a variety of free tutoring services for students enrolled in Math courses numbered 110 through 233. The drop-in center provides free face-to-face tutoring with undergraduate tutors, graduate students, and faculty. The center opens on the first day of class and closes on the last day of class.
  • Study Abroad
    FedEx Global Education Center, (919) 962-7002
    The Study Abroad Office is available to help students find dynamic, engaging, and affordable study abroad opportunities.
  • Biology Peer Tutorial Center
    Free tutoring for BIOL 202, 205, and 252. The tutors in the BIT program are volunteering undergraduate students who excelled in their specific section. Thus, we recommend going to a tutoring session with the section’s specific tutors, as they are familiar with the professor’s teaching style and the material taught.
  • Road to Resilience
    This program is designed to help students on Warning or Probation return to good academic standing. Students meet in a group setting on a weekly basis to strengthen academic skills and become more resilient in the face of scholastic and personal stress. For information, email Dave DeVito at dev@email.unc.edu.

The Learning Center
SASB North, Suites 0118 and 2109, (919) 962-3782
The Learning Center helps students learn more efficiently and perform better in their course work. Services include: Academic Counseling/Coaching, Speed Reading & Study Skills Program, Peer Tutoring (walk in and appointment), Study Groups, and Academic Workshops.

Academic Success Program for Students with LD/ADHD
SASB North, Suite 2109, (919) 962-7227
Provides coaching and academic counseling—-both individually and in groups-—to students with LD/ADHD. Consults with students about how to get evaluated for possible LD/ADHD diagnosis. Students are welcomed and encouraged to use services whether or not they are registered with or receive accommodations from the Department of Accessibility Resources and Service.

The Writing Center
SASB North, Suite 0127, (919) 962-7710
The Center offers both 45-minute face-to-face sessions and an online tutoring system that allows you to submit writing and receive feedback via the web.

English Language Assistance
SASB North, Suite 0127, 9919) 962-7710
The Writing Center also offers mini-courses, grammar workshops, speaking groups, writing groups and a large collection of print resources for ESL students.

  • Chemistry Tutorial
    Kenan Labs C-143
    Open Mon-Thurs 2-8 pm for assistance in Chemistry courses 101, 102, 241, 261, and 262. For more information, please contact Dr. Todd Austell, Coordinator, (919) 962-9429, tlaustell@unc.edu.
  • Accessibility Resource and Services
    SASB North, Suite 2126 (919) 962-8300, accessibility@unc.edu
    Works to ensure that the programs and facilities of the University are accessible and provides reasonable accommodations so students with disabilities may, as independently as possible, meet the demands of university life.
  • Pre-Professional and Pre-Graduate Advising
    Advises undergraduate students considering a graduate degree in various disciplines (sciences, arts and humanities, social sciences, and professional arenas). Advisors help clarify the differences in gaining and utilizing a doctorate vs. a master’s degree and the opportunities a terminal degree may offer. The program is primarily responsible for helping students considering graduate school understand what their next steps are in researching and applying to graduate programs, so that they can move forward independently and effectively.

 

  • Student Emergency Fund
    Through the Student Emergency Fund, the Division of Student Affairs assists Carolina students by providing immediate financial support when the need assistance with unexpected emergency expenses surrounding situations such as accidents, illness, death of a family member, fire damage, or need for temporary housing. Applications are available on the Dean of Students website.
  • One-Card Office
    Lower Level of Daniels Student Stores on South Rd. Entrance is at the base of the staircase to The Pit.
    919-962-8024

    The UNC One Card Office provides an interactive Campus ID Card with superior, innovative technologies in financial and access transactions to our diverse customer base, including faculty, staff, students, and affiliates.
  • Campus Health Services
    James A. Taylor Building, (919) 966-2281
    Offers quality medical care to the UNC student community at a very low cost. CHS offers wellness and preventative care, care for injury, acute or chronic medical conditions, consultation, and medical testing.
  • Student Wellness
    SASB North, 2nd floor
    Aims to create a healthy, safe, and socially just campus community that fosters student well-being and success. Programs include resources on stress management and life balance, substance and alcohol abuse awareness, interpersonal violence prevention, and sexual health and wellness. Offers one-on-one counseling and an anonymous web chat feature.
  • Counseling and Psychological Services
    James A. Taylor Building
    Psychological/counseling services include individual, couples, and group therapy, urgent consultation and crisis intervention, and medication evaluation/management. All individuals seeking new and first time Counseling appointments at CAPS should walk in between 9 a.m. and 12 noon or 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For a psychological crisis, call or walk in right away and speak to a CAPS therapist for same day crisis intervention. If it is after hours, on a weekend, or university holiday, call (919) 966-2281.
  • Dean of Students
    Student Academic Services Building (SASB) Suite 1106, (919) 966-4042, dos@unc.edu
    The Office of the Dean of Students is driven by a strong desire to hep all students achieve success. The staff educates the entire university community, including faculty and staff, about relevant campus policies and responds to your needs through personal attention and advocacy. Students are supported through individual services, innovative programs, co-curricular opportunities, and policy oversight and development.
  • Accessibility Resource and Services
    SASB North, Suite 2126, (919) 962-8300, accessibility@unc.edu
    Works to ensure that the programs and facilities of the University are accessible and provides reasonable accommodations so students with disabilities may, as independently as possible, meet the demands of University life.
  • Housing and Residential Education
    Student Academic Services Building (SASB) North, (919) 962-5401, housing@unc.edu
    The Department of Housing and Residential Education works to create an inclusive on-campus housing environment that promotes personal development, citizenship, involvement, and leadership. Specifically, our residential communities enhance student learning and academic engagement through living and learning programs, Scholar in Residence, and Meals with Heels, a faculty/student shared dining experience.
  • Campus Recreation
    101 Student Recreation Center CB #8610
    Campus Recreation provides a diverse and intentional recreational program in a safe, inclusive, and accessible environment which enhances the social, mental, and physical well-being of the entire university community.
  • Public Safety
    Public Safety Building, 285 Manning Drive, (919) 962-3951 
    The Department of Public Safety supports the university’s core mission of teaching, research, and public service by developing partnerships that encourage problem solving and communication to identify and address public safety needs with professionalism and integrity, while protecting North Carolina’s Future.
  • Carolina Women’s Center
    Stone Center, 150 South Rd, Ste 101, (919) 962-8305
    The Carolina Women’s Center strives to be a leader on efforts and initiatives related to gender equity and a model of a collaborative and flexible educational and work environment that promotes professional and personal growth. The CWC aims to create an inclusive education and work environment where gender is not a barrier to success, difference and diversity are celebrated, and everyone is safe to live, learn, teach, and work without threat of harm or unequal treatment.
  • Gender Violence Service Coordinators (GVSCs) 
    See here for walk-in hours, location and contact info
    The Women’s Center proudly houses the Gender Violence Services Coordinators (GVSC). The role of the GVSC is to be a confidential advocate to all students, faculty, and staff who have experienced, or are experiencing, interpersonal violence and gender-based violence either before or during their time at Carolina. Cassidy Johnson and Holly Lovern serve as the GVSC’s. Cassidy and Holly can provide the following services:

    • Emotional support
    • Answers to questions about reporting options with the University or police
    • Assistance in navigating through the reporting process
    • Links to support options at UNC and in the community (including accompanying you to another office/department/agency to request additional support)
  • American Indian Center
    113A Abernethy Hall, (919) 843-4189
    The AIC is a university-wide public service Center designed to advance the University’s mission of research, education, and service with three primary goals: leadership in American Indian scholarship and research, engagement with and service to native populations, and enrichment of campus diversity and dialogue.
  • Dean of Students
    Student Academic Services Building (SASB) Suite 1106, (919) 966-4042, dos@unc.edu
    The Office of the Dean of Students is driven by a strong desire to hep all students achieve success. The staff educates the entire university community, including faculty and staff, about relevant campus policies and responds to your needs through personal attention and advocacy. Students are supported through individual services, innovative programs, co-curricular opportunities, and policy oversight and development.
  • Diversity and Multicultural Affairs
    South Building, (919) 962-6962
    This department offers students opportunities to get involved in diversity education, engagement in diverse campus groups, recruitment efforts, and participation in leadership programs. Its mission is to build and sustain an inclusive campus community that values and respects all members of the University community.
  • First Generation College Students
    Carmen Gonzalez, cdgonz@email.unc.edu
    Nearly 20% of Carolina undergraduates are First Generation College Students (FGCS). FGCS are students that come to Carolina from a family in which neither parent has a 4 year undergraduate degree. We proudly call our first generation students “Carolina Firsts.” The Carolina Firsts student organization represents and connects FGCS at Carolina.
  • Housing and Residential Education
    Student Academic Services Building (SASB) North, (919) 962-5401, housing@unc.edu
    The Department of Housing and Residential Education works to create an inclusive on-campus housing environment that promotes personal development, citizenship, involvement, and leadership. Specifically, our residential communities enhance student learning and academic engagement through living and learning programs, Scholar in Residence, and Meals with Heels, a faculty/student shared dining experience.
  • Information and Technology Services
    (919) 962-HELP
    The ITS Response Center (ITRC) provides technical support to the UNC computing community 24 hours a day via (919) 962-HELP or through the Online Help Request form. For walk-in support, you can visit our location in the lower level of the R.B. House Undergraduate Library (next to the Pit).
  • International Student and Scholar Services
    FedEx Global Education Center Room 2004, (919) 962-5661, oisss@unc.edu
    Serves as the principle administrative, programming, and advising office for approximately 3,000 international students, faculty, and academic staff at UNC-Chapel Hill.
  • Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence
    Graham Memorial, (919) 966-5110, jcue@unc.edu
    Information on undergraduate research and the honors program is available at the Johnston Center as well as enriching arts and cultural activities. The Center also has one of the best lounges on campus for studying and getting a cup of coffee!
  • New Student and Carolina Parent Programs
    Student Academic Services Building (SASB) South Suite 3308, (919) 962-8304
    Provides new undergraduate students the information and activities needed to transition smoothly to the University and to promote an on-going relationship between the parents/families of all Carolina students and the University.
  • Sustainability Office
    Giles Horney Building, (919) 843-5295
    This office works cooperatively with other offices, departments, and organizations across campus to advance the triple bottom line of ecological integrity, economic prosperity, and social equity. Online resources, a lending library, and a news/events listserv are available to students interested in creating a more sustainable campus community.
  • Veteran Students
    The military veterans receiving their education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are a vital component of our campus community. We recognize their sacrifices and value their life experiences as they enhance the diversity of our student body. To learn visit this site, designed to help veterans and others receiving U.S. military benefits to make a successful transition into the Carolina community
  • Campus Y
    For over 150 years, the Campus Y has been at the heart of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is the pursuit of social justice through promoting pluralism, and as such it is an organization that welcomes and supports a diversity of views, approaches and activities in its agenda to drive lasting social change.
  • University Libraries
    The UNC library system is consistently ranked among the top twenty in the country, and is one of the leading research libraries in the South. Students can find scholarly materials to support every learning endeavor and contact librarians by phone, online or in-person.
  • University Career Services
    Hanes Hall, (919) 962-6507
    Works with students individually and in group settings to help them clarify their values, interests, and skills in order to make decisions about majors and careers.
  • Carolina Leadership Development
    Carolina Union, lead@email.unc.edu
    Offers a variety of services and programs including peer mentoring and leadership development programs for everyone interested in leadership at the University.
  • Campus Y
    180A E. Cameron Avenue, (919) 962-2333
    For over 150 years, the Campus Y has been at the heart of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is the pursuit of social justice through promoting pluralism, and as such it is an organization that welcomes and supports a diversity of views, approaches and activities in its agenda to drive lasting social change.
  • Study Abroad
    FedEx Global Education Center, (919) 962-7002
    The Study Abroad Office is   available to help students find dynamic, engaging, and affordable study abroad opportunities.
  • Carolina Center for Public Service
    Student Union, Suite 3514, CB #5210 (919) 962-0902 & 205 Wilson Street, CB #3142 (919) 843-7568
    The Carolina Center for Public Service strengthens the University’s public service commitment by promoting engaged scholarship and service that are responsive to the concerns of the state, the nation, and the world. Through a variety of student initiatives like the APPLES Service-Learning Program and the Buckley Public Service Scholars Program, students are given a framework to explore service opportunities, learn new skills, link their academic experience to making a difference in the community, and connect to other students who care about similar issues.

    APPLES Service-Learning Program
    3514 Carolina Union, apples@unc.edu, (919) 962-0902
    Builds sustainable, service-learning  partnerships among students, faculty, and communities in North Carolina and beyond. APPLES offers a variety of programs, including: Alternative Breaks, Robert E. Bryan Social Innovation Fellowships, Service-Learning Courses, Service-Learning Initiatives, and Service-Learning Internships.

    Buckley Public Service Scholars Program
    3514 Carolina Union, service_scholars@unc.edu, (919) 962-0902
    Supports and strengthens Carolina students’ commitment to service and guides them through training and course work that make their service more effective. Participants broaden their concept of public service and engagement through: meaningful service with community organizations, skills trainings, service-learning courses, North Carolina Outward Bound scholarships, “Philanthropy as a Tool for Social Change” course in public health, and SMART mentoring.

  • Embark Carolina
    Embark Carolina is a new, dynamic resource in the university’s effort to open access to global opportunities so that more diverse students can pursue more diverse experiences.

      

 

 

Newly Admitted First-Year Students

No. We suggest that you choose a New Student Orientation that works best with your schedule, because your registration dates are based on when you virtually attend. We have an equal number of course seats reserved for every registration window just for first-year students, so it does not matter which orientation session you select.

You will receive more information about how to prepare for the Academic Advising session at Orientation in an email closer to your orientation session date. Be sure to check your email frequently. If you have questions, you can also bring those to orientation to be answered.

Please note that in order for your attendance at the live Zoom sessions to count, you must be logged in using your UNC Zoom account through unc.zoom.us. To ensure you are logged in to your official UNC Zoom account, you need to:

  1. Use a new browser window (not just tab)
  2. Go to UNC.zoom.us, log in with ONYEN and password.
  3. Click/hover on your name, if it doesn’t say licensed, then you need to click log out.
  4. Next, go back to UNC.zoom.us and log in again with ONYEN and password.
  5.  Now your name should say licensed next to it and you can open the links.

 

If you don’t see your NSO Session site on Sakai:

  1. Please click on the 9 white squares image where it says “sites,” at the top right of your screen.
  2. Then, listed under Projects, you should see Session “#” FY Orientation.
  3. If you click the star next to the site, it will then appear at the top of your main Sakai page.

No, you will not be prevented from registering in July. Please email your issue to grr@unc.edu (include your full name and PID with a summary of your issue). Please attend NSO and we will help troubleshoot your GRR form issue by email.

UNC is constantly monitoring the situation. For updates and current university operations, please visit https://www.unc.edu/coronavirus/.

Many of these questions will be answered during New Student Orientation where you will be able to learn more from advisors about first-year appropriate courses. After this session, you will be able to identify courses that you want to register for during your registration window in July.

Your registration date will be based off your New Student Orientation date. Visit the New Student & Family Programs website for more details.

For your first semester only, Academic Advising will pre-register you for two courses to help you get a “jump start” on your registration for fall. (Honors students are pre-registered in two courses by the Honors Program.) If you need to change these courses, you will be able to do so once your registration period opens in July.

You will send your AP/IB scores to Admissions directly from the respective testing service. For instance, SAT and AP scores need to be sent directly to UNC Admissions from the College Board. Please visit the First-Year Checklist for more information.

Departments can restrict enrollment in their course offerings for many reasons. Common reasons: (a) The class is reserved for certain majors only or, (b) The class is reserved for students with a prescribed class standing (i.e. Juniors or Seniors). Another factor that could be preventing enrollment is that classes with section numbers of 990, 991 or 992 are offered online and are not open to first year students in their first term. Classes with a 951-section number are initially reserved for part-time UNC students.  Courses with this section number may open to full-time students in mid-to-late August.

You can begin adjusting your schedule during open enrollment. You can find the dates here: https://registrar.unc.edu/academic-calendar/.

Be flexible. Continue to search for open classes to add to your fall schedule. You have until the end of your registration period.  If you cannot find seats for all your top choices, go to your back up list and add open sections to your schedule until you have at least 12 credit hours of enrollment. You can also adjust your schedule again between the start of open enrollment for first-year students (July 29, 2020) and the end of the first week of classes.

Try to avoid registering for courses for which you expect to earn credit. BE (by exam) credit may fulfill general education and/or major requirements or may provide you with the prerequisite needed for another class.

  • To be considered for credit and/or placement, students must ask the appropriate testing service to send UNC Admissions their official test results. Please use the Placement Credit Tables as a reference to see scores and credit hours awarded.
  • Many courses have prerequisites which are set in ConnectCarolina and you may not be able to enroll in them unless you have that posted credit.  If you do not have that credit, you must wait until you have sent your scores in and the credit is evaluated and posted by UNC Admissions.

Registration is a very fluid process. Students will be dropping and adding classes from now until the beginning of the semester. Below are some tips to help you enroll.

  • Continue to check availability throughout the registration period.
  • Search for open sections that you may not have added to your shopping cart. You can also look on your First Year Advising Sakai site for more information about open course options.
  • Register for another course of interest for now.
  • Check seat availability during open enrollment through the first week of classes.

Remember, Academic Advising cannot enroll you in courses.

You will receive a schedule feedback email from an academic advisor within 10 business days after registering. This advisor will go through your schedule to make sure it is well-balanced and first-year appropriate. If you have any concerns after receiving this email, please respond to the advisor who sent your feedback email.

You will find out your assigned advisor during the fall semester. Your assigned advisor gives you a contact in our office, but that does not have to be the only advisor you see. Our office is organized by three different divisions- HASS (Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences), STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), and the Hardin Hub (All Majors). Depending on the division in which your major falls, any advisor on that division can assist you.

Appointments for the fall semester will open in September for all students. Since we understand you may have questions before that time, our office holds all day drop-ins beginning the Monday after move-in day and ending the 5th day of class. To find our drop-in hours, please look at our advising homepage.

There are three ways to speak to an advisor. You can make an appointment, visit us during drop-ins, or utilize our online chat. Our appointment scheduler, hours, and locations are all on our homepage. Please note that we are not taking any appointments from first-year students until September

Prior to New Student Orientation, you should jot down the questions that you have and bring them to New Student Orientation. Most (if not all) questions will be answered during the parent session and your student’s advising session. During orientation, you will learn more about FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act). According to federal law, once a student enrolls at the University, the student’s parents/guardians do not have automatic access to the student’s educational records unless they claim the student as a dependent for federal income tax purposes or have the student’s written consent. Students will learn how they can give consent at orientation. The FERPA consent form takes a little while to be processed, so we encourage parents/guardians to have students call with any questions that they have. For more suggestions for families, visit the Suggestions for Families page https://advising.unc.edu/for-families/suggestions-for-families/.

For a more comprehensive list of frequently asked questions, please visit your class’s Sakai site.

Newly Admitted Transfer Students

After you accept your admission, you will need to pay your enrollment deposit and add yourself to the Academic Advising transfer Sakai page. Log in with your Onyen. (See below for how to create your Onyen.)

From there some notable next steps include:

  • Create your Onyen. Your Onyen (the only name you ever need) is your user name to be used for all things Carolina.
  • Set up your HeelMail. Your HeelMail is your email account for UNC. This will be used for all official communication with the university.
  • Log in and complete your to-do list items on Sakai, most importantly, watch your Transfer Student Advising module and register for classes.
  • Make an Academic Advising Appointment this can be done in-person, via Skype or the phone. During this meeting, you will discuss the credits that you have received from your previous institution, contact information about your new department, as well as your progress towards your Carolina degree.
  • Welcome to the Carolina Family Letter 2020

Now that you are here at UNC-Chapel Hill, it is important to familiarize yourself with the new policies, procedures, and overall degree requirements. Many of these policies may differ from your previous institution. The University Catalog is a great place to start to learn UNC-Chapel Hill policies.

As soon as you have accepted your admission and paid your deposit, we encourage you to enroll as soon as possible. This can be even before you meet with an academic advisor. Registering immediately will help you to get into classes, and then you will be able to refine your schedule once you meet with an advisor.

You can use the online catalog and major worksheets to review the course requirements for your major at Carolina.

  • Be sure to have your final transcript sent from your previous institution. If you received an associate’s degree, please be sure that the degree date is stated on the transcript. Once this has been submitted, the Admissions team on campus will evaluate your transcript to determine which transfer credits you will receive at UNC.
  • You can find the credits on your transfer credit report, course history and in your Tar Heel Tracker.

If UNC rejected a course from your previous institution or you were awarded elective hours but think the course fits a general education or major requirement, you can submit a Transfer Re-evaluation. Be sure to read the rules on the transfer re-evaluation page to determine if it is appropriate to request a revaluation.

If you have already paid your deposit but are still have difficulty accessing Sakai, please complete this form for assistance.

  • Transfer Student Sakai Log-In Issue Form

    Thank you for taking the time to let us know about your issue. You should have already added yourself to Sakai via this site: https://sakai.unc.edu/portal/site/TransferAdvising. If you never used that link, well, then that's why you haven't been added! If you did add yourself through that link and still can't access the Sakai site, please complete that form and allow us 2-3 business days to respond and help you troubleshoot.
  • Tar Heel Tracker Tutorial: The Tar Heel Tracker is our graduation audit system. This a great guide on how your credits are working towards meeting all graduation requirements. Please note, this should not be used for graduation clearance, please be sure to check in with Academic Advising.
  • ConnectCarolina Tutorial Video Series: Connect Carolina is the portal in which you will register for classes. These short video tutorials will walk you through how to register.

When you arrive at UNC for the start of the fall semester, you should make an effort to get connected to your academic department. The best place to start is by attending your department transfer meetings. These will occur the day before classes begin. A schedule and contact names for each department will be coming soon.

A new policy began in fall of 2017 for any students transferring in at least 30 hours (post-high school). This policy grants transfer students a ninth and tenth semester automatically, if it is desired. This provides more flexibility for students completing a sequenced major, opting into a double major or adding a minor. If you have questions about your credits, please feel free to stop by academic advising.

The following are other resources on campus that support transfer student success:

  • Transfer Student Resources is a one stop shop for academic resources for new transfer students. This site highlights opportunities to get involved in and out of the classroom as you transfer to Carolina.
  • Transfer Student Ambassadors are a group of students that work with New Students and Family programs to ensure new transfer students have a positive transition to campus.
  • Transfer United is our Residential Learning program on campus for new transfer students. Students in this program live together in Carmichael Residence Hall.
  • Tau Sigma National Honor Society is a national honor society that recognizes new transfer students that achieve a 3.5 GPA or higher in their first semester on campus.
  • Tar Heel Transfers is a student group on campus specifically for transfer students.
  • Carolina Firsts is a program for first generation college students at Carolina designed to equip students for social, academic and professional success at Carolina and beyond.
  • Other Campus Organizations for more than 700 student organizations on campus.

Newly Admitted Student-Athletes in Summer Session 2

All students at the University are assigned an academic advisor prior to beginning their first semester at UNC. We work closely with the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes to enhance the academic advising experience for our student-athletes. Student-athletes will meet regularly with both departments and will possess a working knowledge of the services provided by each.

Once on campus, students will have the opportunity to meet with both their academic counselor (Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes) as well as their Academic Advisor in the Academic Advising Program. We will also meet with you during your time at New Student Orientation as part of the standard Day 1 program.

Prior to attending summer school we would like you to complete the following four steps:

STEP 1: Review the Making Connections Curriculum (You must click on and read/view all 5 bullet items.)

STEP 2: Review Information on Majors and Minors (You must click on and read/view all 3 bullet items.)

STEP 3: Learn about course registration in Connect Carolina (You must click on and view all 5 bullet items.)

STEP 4:  Schedule a 30-minute Academic Advising Appointment

  • Schedule a 30-minute telephone (or Skype) appointment. An academic advisor will assist you with course selection for summer school as well as provide an opportunity for you to ask questions once the information above (Steps 1, 2 and 3) has been reviewed.

Thank you for taking the time to complete Steps 1-4. We look forward to meeting you this summer and assisting you in your academic journey! Please do not hesitate to contact us at advisingforstudentathletesAAP@unc.edu should you have additional questions and concerns.

For additional information, contact the following individuals in the Academic Advising Program:

  • Spencer Welborn, Assistant Dean, 2018 Steele Building, 919-843-8917
  • Leah Frierson, Assistant Dean, 2017B Steele Building, 919-843-8909

First-Year Students

We request that all first-year students visit Academic Advising during their first year at Carolina. This is important to set the stage for the next four years. In this meeting, you will discuss majors and minors you are interested in, goal setting, your course schedule and more. Come in early to be sure you make the connection with an advisor.

You will be assigned an advisor after orientation, however, you can meet with any advisor.

Your first year at Carolina is an important time for major exploration. You will need to declare your primary major by the end of your sophomore year, but if you have majors in mind, it is a good idea to take major exploration classes to test out those majors. Some majors also have sequences in them. Schedule an advising appointment to chat further and/or check out the academic worksheets to see what is expected in each major.

Workshops are offered in the fall and the spring to prepare you for registration. Look out for emails and/or announcements on Sakai about Advising 101 workshops if you would prefer a group advising environment.

The University Registrar sets the academic calendar including when you will register. These dates are set at the beginning of each semester. Your enrollment period will show up on your student center of connect Carolina.

Steps for Success in Sophomore and Junior Years

The following are steps to success that we recommend in your sophomore and junior years:

  • By the end of your sophomore year, you must declare your primary major. You can do this through an appointment with an academic advisor.
  • Failure to declare by the start of your junior year will result in a hold on your account that will prevent registration in the fall for your sixth semester (spring junior year).
  • If you have entered your junior year and are considering changing your major, it may still be possible. You are able to change your major if you can complete the new major within your allotted eight semesters. We encourage you to schedule an appointment with an advisor to talk about your options.

We encourage you to schedule an appointment to check in on your progress and talk about how your interests have changed since your first year at Carolina. This is the time to see where you stand with your general education requirements, progress toward your major and talk about your short and long term academic goals.

Your sophomore and junior years are a great time to consider pursuing a second major or minor. Consider declaring or talking about options with an academic advisor.

  • Your sophomore year is a critical time to build relationships with your academic department. Stop by and utilize office hours, join clubs in your major and check out your department listserv for up-to-date information and opportunities. Building these relationships now can be essential as you become a Junior/Senior and may need letters of recommendation, an advisor for a thesis and more.
  • Some academic departments will require you to meet with the department each semester, but even if yours does not, check in with them. Consider meeting with a departmental advisor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies. This can be a great way to connect with the department to share your career and personal goals.

If you did not get involved in your first year, your sophomore year is a great time to find a few organizations that match your interests and career aspirations. Check out a list of all orgs. 

Sophomore year is the year to do this. Check out this one-stop shop to learn about our professional schools on campus and how to apply

If you are considering law school, medical school or a graduate program, we encourage you to get connected to Career Services. They have pre-law, pre-professional and pre-health advisors/resources that can support you as you prepare for entrance exams and graduate applications.

Also, check out the resources the Learning Center has to prepare students for the GRE, GMAT, LSAT and MCAT (including access to free practice tests and additional resources).

There are many offices on campus that can support you academically. Here are a few that can be helpful:

Senior Year and Graduation

During your final year at UNC, you should do the following:

You should apply for graduation when you register for your final term at UNC. If you are blocked from applying for some reason or if you miss the application deadline, you must contact the Graduation Coordinator in Academic Advising. Late applicants are not guaranteed to have their names listed in the commencement program.

  1. Log in to your ConnectCarolina Student Center with your UNC Onyen and password.
  2. Select “Apply for Graduation” from the drop-down menu on the Academics tab.
  3. Follow the directions to confirm all program and personal information.

Once you’ve applied, advisors will review your application. This can take quite a while since we receive 3,500 applications each spring. We will confirm what you’ve got left and email you the requirements. When grades are in, assuming you’ve met all requirements, we’ll approve you for graduation!

All diplomas are mailed by the Registrar to your permanent address about 3 months after the official graduation date. To assure your diploma is delivered correctly, verify and update your address online if needed.

To assure your diploma is printed correctly, verify the spelling and punctuation of your name in the University’s records. You must visit the Office of the University Registrar in the Student & Academic Services Building for official name changes.

You can request an official transcript or proof of awarded degree after you’ve completed all degree requirements.

If you have fewer than 12 hours of required coursework left in your final semester, you are eligible to apply for a senior underload. To do so, you must apply for graduation and request the Senior Underload option. There are several rules and regulations to consider:

  • Senior underloads are allowed only in the semester in which you are graduating.
  • You must be enrolled in all remaining degree requirements and intend to graduate at the end of the current semester.
  • Applications for graduation with senior underload status must be submitted by the posted deadline each semester (the option to request a senior underload is available as part of the graduation application process).
  • Academic Advising will NOT drop the courses for you; this is your choice and responsibility.
  • You have until the drop deadline of the semester to decide whether or not to drop any courses not required for graduation.

Yes, there are several financial consequences that you should assess thoroughly before applying for a senior underload:

  • You are responsible for full payment of student fees, but you but may be entitled to a partial refund of tuition.
  • Any refund will be based on the number of enrolled hours and the published Tuition and Fee rates for the current semester.
  • You must check with the Cashier’s Office regarding the amount and timing of any refund.
  • Students who are approved for a senior underload will be allowed to drop non-required courses after the 10th day of the semester, but will not be eligible for a tuition refund.
  • Check with the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid to see whether dropping below twelve hours will affect your aid package.
  • Check with other insurance providers (car, rental, other) to see if your rates will change if you carry fewer than twelve hours.
  • Consider the perceptions of future employers and admissions committees. Do they expect applicants to maintain full-time status?  Are you doing anything else substantive with your time?
  • The University Student Health Insurance Plan requires full-time degree-seeking status AND enrollment in at least six academic hours. Seniors on underload meet the degree-seeking status requirement. Students in part-time studies do not.

Yes. Our part-time studies division does not grant degrees, so all students must be listed as full-time, even if underloading.

Underloading students are still eligible for basketball tickets, gym privileges, and all the other perks of being a full-time student because they’re paying student fees.

This takes careful planning with Advising and the Study Abroad Office as it can take several weeks or months for study abroad credit to be approved and posted to your ConnectCarolina. We recommend you make an appointment with each office to discuss how this may impact your graduation timeline.

No more than six of your final 30 hours may be transfer credit. If you want to try transferring credit in during your senior year, be sure to discuss your plans with an advisor to understand how transfer policies relate to completing your graduation requirements.

That’s perfectly fine! It is common for summer graduates to participate in the May or December ceremonies since there is not a ceremony in August. Keep in mind your official graduation date is when you complete all of your degree requirements and walking is not synonymous with graduating. Check with your major department regarding their policy on summer graduates participating in their individual ceremony.

Students who graduate in August or December will be listed in the December program. Students graduating in May will be listed in the May program.

Learn more about the main commencement ceremony for December and May.

Self-Guided Resources

Students with a growth mindset believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work. Students with a fixed mindset believe their intelligence or talent is fixed. These students spend their time documenting abilities instead of developing their abilities. It is far more beneficial to have a growth mindset. Read psychologist Carol Dweck’s book to learn more and check out the resources below!

Resilient students bounce back in the face of challenge, change and stress. Being resilient doesn’t mean a student never experiences difficulty or stress. However, resilient individuals respond to stress in ways that help them not only recover, but grow and thrive. Review the following materials to enhance your ability to become and stay resilient!

Research shows us that your happiness, motivation and academic performance are heavily linked to the perceptions and attitudes you hold toward yourself and your abilities. Positive thinking not only opens your mind to new possibilities, but it also increases your capacity to build skills and be successful.

Having goals helps develop and maintain motivation, vision and focus. When you set goals for yourself, make sure they are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound, and be sure you have a way to hold yourself accountable for meeting them.

Remember, when it comes to studying and preparing for tests, it’s all about working smarter, not harder. Be sure you are studying using strategies that prepare you for exams that assess you at high levels. Map out concepts, talk through content with a peer and create study guides for yourself. Break down the material into small bite-sized pieces and take advantage of office hours and review sessions.

Make sure you approach your readings similar to how you approach studying: read smarter, not harder. Ensure you are using active reading techniques that help you engage with the text at high levels. Try not to jump too quickly into your readings, but rather, spend time pre-reading first. Take the time to read the abstracts, summaries and chapter headings, which will help you approach the reading with purpose. Pay attention to key words, reflection questions and whether or not you’re internalizing what you’re reading. Recognize if you need to read a section again, and never read without a writing utensil in your hand! Highlighting, underlining and taking notes helps you stay engaged.

For most students, picking a college major is not the same as picking a career. If you specialize in something like nursing, accounting or engineering, you’re learning a specific trade and will likely continue with that. Most majors, however, prepare you for a range of careers that you can be trained to handle once you graduate.

How many times have you gone to the library with the best of intentions, fully prepared to spend the next hours dedicated to your studies, only to wind up distracted and unproductive? It happens to the best of us, but being able to remain focused while studying is crucial to your academic success.

Successful students build and maintain productive relationships with academic instructors and university professionals. Successful students also communicate effectively and take responsibility for their own academic success.

Time management is a lifelong skill. The strong time management habits you develop now can be applied to your life beyond college — to your career, personal goals, and family life. Learning to think about your time in a meaningful way now will help you manage your life as it changes and grows later on.

students from a variety of academic disciplines who are specially trained in teaching writing. Our online resources are available to everyone; they offer helpful advice for writers and instructors on a variety of topics.

High-impact opportunities are engaging, hands-on opportunities that have been shown to impact student well-being and performance. We encourage you to participate in the following––

Withdrawing/Returning to UNC

If you are a graduate student seeking readmission, please click here for more information.

We encourage you to schedule a “Returning Student Consultation” to address any questions that you may have with a counselor in the Academic and Eligibility and Outreach Team. We are available to meet with you in person, online via Skype or Zoom web conference, or by phone.

Students who wish to return to the university and who were not enrolled during the most recent semester (fall, spring) need to submit the Return to Carolina survey through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to officially notify the University of their intent to re-enroll at UNC. 

For additional readmission related questions, contact rad@admission.unc.edu.

Campus UnitsCommon Hold TypesWhat to do?
Academic AdvisingAcademic advising hold, Additional semester holdContact Academic Advising to take appropriate action.
Steele Building
214 E. Cameron Avenue
advising.unc.edu
919-966-5116
Cashiers OfficeLate payment, prepayment, or loan repayment services holdsContact the University Cashier to settle your financial accounts.
The University Cashier’s Office
2215 SASB North
cashier.unc.edu
919-962-1368
Counseling Psychological ServicesCAPS hold for psychological withdrawalStudents who have received a psychological withdrawal from Counseling and Psychological Services must receive clearance from CAPS prior to re-enrollment. This must be initiated 6-8 weeks prior to the term start.
To schedule a clearance appointment, call 919-966-3658
Student ConductHonor court, conduct sanctions, etc.Office of Student Conduct
1125 SASB North
studentconduct.unc.edu
919-962-0805
UNC Transportation & ParkingParking finesReturn your parking permit and pay any outstanding parking citations.
Transportation & Parking
Public Safety Building
285 Manning Dr.
move.unc.edu
919-962-3951
Academic Eligibility and OutreachAcademic Eligibility HoldContact Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team at studentsuccess@unc.edu or schedule a “Returning Student Consultation” to remove hold

Degree-seeking students who are suspended must submit an Appeal for Probation in order to enroll in courses at UNC. This includes full-time coursework, part-time classroom students, and Carolina Courses online. We encourage you to schedule a “Returning Student Consultation” to address any questions that you may have regarding navigating both the appeal for probation and readmission processes with a counselor in the Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team.

If you are unsure of your academic standing, contact the Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team via email at studentsuccess@unc.edu.

If you received a medical or psychological withdrawal, you must be cleared by Campus Health or CAPS 6-10 weeks prior to your planned return. To be cleared, a provider must fill out the Clearance Form; the form must be returned to Campus Health or CAPS. You must be cleared in order to access course registration. Please note: Students seeking clearance for Summer 2020, should submit the clearance form March 4 – April 1; for Fall 2020 the form should be submitted June 9-July 7. 

Academic Advising
Reconnect with Academic Advising to review/update your degree plan including intended major(s) and minor(s), update your Academic Worksheet and determine appropriate coursework. Contact advising.unc.edu or 919-966-5116 to schedule an appointment.

Accessibility Resources and Services
If you have a disability or medical condition for which an appropriate accommodation is needed, you are encouraged to connect with Accessibility Resources and Services to learn more about the ARS self-identification process. For more information email ars@unc.edu. 

Carolina Housing 
If you would like to live on campus upon your return, submit a housing application for the academic year you will need housing for. If the Housing application was cancelled when you student left, you can also contact Housing and request that the contract be reinstated.

One Card Office
Online One Card management is available at onecard.unc.edu. This feature will allow you to buy or change meal plan, add money to your flex account, check your One Card balance, and much more. Contact onecard@unc.edu or 919-962-8024 with questions.

Onyen Services
Once you have been admitted and accepted enrollment, please retrieve your Onyen and create your password. You’ll then need your Onyen to access ConnectCarolina and to register for courses. Note: Once your account has been reactivated, be sure to log in to ConnectCarolina to address any checklist items or accounts holds.

Parking
For information related to student parking permits, parking availability, and commuter parking options see Transportation and Parking

Veterans Resources 
Do you receive Veterans Administration educational benefits? Please contact your VA School Certifying Official, http://registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/veteran-affairs/.

Academic Progress Reports

Faculty-student interaction is key to undergraduate success.
The Academic Progress Report (APR) System in ConnectCarolina enables instructors to communicate with students exhibiting signs of academic distress and students succeeding in a course. Between the 2nd and 11th weeks of a fall or spring semester, an instructor of a course may issue each student up to 2 of the following APR comments:
Comments Indicating Concern:
  • Assignment/Homework Concern
  • Class Participation Concern
  • Quiz/Examination Concern
  • Writing Skills Concern
  • General Concern
  • Immediate Action Suggested

Comments Regarding Concern for Attendance:

  • Never Attended
  • Intermittent Attendance
  • Stopped Attending

Positive Feedback:

  • Good Class Participation
  • Keep up Good Work
  • Showing Improvement
  • Outstanding Performance

If you receive an APR, you will be notified through your official UNC-Chapel Hill email account. For additional information, please review the following FAQs.

APRs are comments entered by your instructor regarding your academic performance in a given course. APRs can include positive or constructive feedback. If you receive an APR with constructive feedback, you should take action as soon as possible.

Example APR you might receive for a class

Example of summary email containing all APRs you received for the semester

You will receive an email a few days before the start of each APR period to remind you to keep an eye on your university email account for APRs over the next several weeks. When you receive an APR from your instructor, you will be notified through your University email account as well.

APRs are sent between the 4th and 7th weeks of the Fall and Spring semesters.

No, progress reports will not appear on your official or unofficial transcript.

First, be sure to click the acknowledgement button on the bottom of your email notification. This lets support offices know that you have read the feedback provided to you.

The actions you might take after receiving an Academic Progress Report will vary depending on your individual academic situation. The notification email you receive will contain the specific steps recommended for you. If you have a questions about the APR, you can contact your Academic Advisor or The Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team. Below are possible actions you could take, depending on the type of progress report comment(s) you receive:

Academic Concerns

  • Writing Skills Concern
  • Quiz/Examination Concern
  • Assignment/Homework Concern
  • Class Participation Concern
Academic Concern Actions:

  1. Visit your instructor during faculty office hours or make an appointment with your instructor to discuss your progress in the course and strategies for improvement.
  2. Meet with an Academic Advisor to discuss strategies for success in the course and, if necessary, dropping the course.
  3. Explore university resources, such as the Learning Center or the Writing Center.
Attendance Concerns

  • Stopped Attending
  • Never Attended
  • Intermittent Attendance
Attendance Concern Actions:

  1. If you think you should not be enrolled in this course, check your enrollment status in ConnectCarolina and meet with an advisor in The Academic Advising Program.
  2. If you have circumstances preventing you from attending class, consider meeting with a professional in the Office of the Dean of Students to discuss your situation.
  3. If you are experiencing any health issues preventing you from attending class, visit with Campus Health Services and/or Counseling and Psychological Services.
General Concern or Immediate Action

  • Immediate Action Suggested
  • General Concern
General Concern Actions:

  1. Visit your instructor during faculty office hours or make an appointment with your instructor to discuss your progress in the course and strategies for improvement.
  2. If you have circumstances preventing you from meeting course requirements, consider meeting with a professional in the Office of the Dean of Students to discuss your situation.
  3. If you are experiencing any health issues, visit with Campus Health Services and/or Counseling and Psychological Services.
  4. Explore university resources for academic success.
Positive Feedback

  • Good Class Participation
  • Keep Up the Good Work
  • Outstanding Performance
  • Showing Improvement
Positive Feedback Actions:

  1. Visit your instructor during faculty office hours or make an appointment with your instructor to discuss opportunities for further enrichment in this academic area such as additional courses, opportunities for research, internships, or graduate school opportunities.
  2. Visit University Career Services to explore career opportunities in this area.
  3. Optimize your academic experience by visiting the Learning Center or Writing Center.
  4. Consider participating in a high-impact activity, such as Undergraduate Research, Study Abroad, Global Initiatives, or Service Learning.

The APR process starts when your instructor enters progress reports in ConnectCarolina. This causes several things to happen, all of which are intended to help you reflect and take action as necessary to succeed:

  • An email containing your instructor’s comments is sent to you.
  • Academic Advisors are notified of each comment you receive in ConnectCarolina.
  • Reports are also shared with the Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team and other campus resources who collaborate to provide coordinated student support.

Your APR comments can be seen by your instructor as well as other academic support staff like Academic Advisors and the Academic Eligibility and Outreach Team.

You may receive up to 2 instructor comments for each course you are taking. For example, if you are enrolled in 5 courses, you can receive up to 10 total APR comments.

Yes, you can receive up to 2 APR comments per course.

The comments you may receive from your instructor fall into 4 categories: academic performance concerns, attendance concerns, positive feedback, and general concerns. Below are the comments associated with each category.

Academic Concerns

  • Writing Skills Concern
  • Quiz/Examination Concern
  • Assignment/Homework Concern
  • Class Participation Concern
Positive Feedback

  • Good Class Participation
  • Keep Up the Good Work
  • Outstanding Performance
  • Showing Improvement
Attendance Concerns

  • Stopped Attending
  • Never Attended
  • Intermittent Attendance
General Concern or Immediate Action

  • Immediate Action Suggested
  • General Concern

If you have questions about the specific APR feedback given to you for a particular course, contact your professor for more information. If you have any other questions about APRs or the APR process, contact the Assistant Director for Academic Eligibility and Interventions here: http://studentsuccess.unc.edu/contact-us/